Block-to-Block Match

Block-to-Block Direct Matching is a concept that I learned through visual therapy.  There were so many wonderful developmental points to this activity that I added it to the 4 and 5 Year Curricula.  Plus, it is fun!

See also: Visual Perception Block Activities and Further Learning with Blocks

Items Needed: 

Procedure:

  1. Child is seated at a desk or table that fits his/her size.

  2. Adult is seated across from the child (facing the child).

  3. The adult selects 2 or 3 block, one of which should be square.

  4. The adult creates a pattern parallel to the table and with the square the central figure.  The other shapes should each touch the square along an entire side.

  5. The child is asked to select blocks that match the example in shape, number, and color.  All attributes should be identical.

  6. The child is asked to make a pattern on the plastic which will exactly match the example.  There is no time limit and the child should be encouraged to compare his reproduction to the example.

  7. When the child is satisfied with his pattern, the adult picks up the plastic sheet and superimposes it (lays it on top) upon the child's pattern.

    Pattern BlocksPattern above is super-imposed to show the child that the patterns do not match.

  8. Encourage the child to evaluate the two patterns to see if they match or if there is anything he/she can do to change the blocks to "make them look even more like each other."

  9. If the child wishes to make a change, remove the adult's example on the plastic sheet and allow the child to make any changes.  When completed, again super-impose the plastic sheet and compare.  This may need to occur several times.

    Pattern BlocksPattern above is super-imposed to show the child that the patterns do match.

  10. Continue making patterns at the same level of difficulty until the child adequately demonstrates mastery.

  11. Switch roles and allow the child to create a pattern and the adult copy it.  Allow the child to verbally describe why he/she "agrees" or "disagrees" with the adult's rendition.  

Increasing in Difficulty:

Begin with Pattern #1 and increase as the child shows mastery.  

1. Difficulty 1  The square is the central part of pattern and is parallel to the table.  The other blocks touch the square along an entire side.

2. Difficulty 2  The square is the central part of pattern and is parallel to the table.  One or more blocks do not touch the square along an entire side.


3. Difficulty 3  The square is the central part of pattern and is parallel to the table.  The other blocks create "pockets" or an empty space.


4. Difficulty 4  The square is the central part of pattern and is parallel to the table.  The other blocks are separated from the square.

5. Difficulty 5  The square is parallel to the table but is no longer the central piece of the pattern.

6. Difficulty 6 The square is tilted.     

All information adapted from text from Robert B. Sanet, O.D. and Linda Z. Sanet. C.O.V.T.  Copyright 1998

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